Kenalog steroid

Early trials of intra-articular corticosteroids showed equal systemic absorption of methylprednisolone in patients with rheumatic and osteoarthritic hands 42 and knees. 43 This suggests that steroid pharmacokinetics, rather than disease-related factors, should guide steroid selection. A recent review by the National Health Service of the United Kingdom 44   recommends triamcino-lone and methylprednisolone as preferred agents for injection of large joints (., knee). For smaller joints (., finger), either hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone (Hydeltrasol, brand no longer available in the United States) is recommended. Tables 5 and 6 45 compare commonly available steroid preparations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior) Sexes Eligible for Study:   All Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes Criteria Inclusion Criteria:

The most common side effect of topical corticosteroid use is skin atrophy. All topical steroids can induce atrophy, but higher potency steroids, occlusion, thinner skin, and older patient age increase the risk. The face, the backs of the hands, and intertriginous areas are particularly susceptible. Resolution often occurs after discontinuing use of these agents, but it may take months. Concurrent use of topical tretinoin (Retin-A) % may reduce the incidence of atrophy from chronic steroid applications. 30 Other side effects from topical steroids include permanent dermal atrophy, telangiectasia, and striae.

Sounds like they had a DeQuervain’s injection (if it’s intratendinous instead of just under the tendon sheath there can be a lot of resistance…especially if using a tuberculin syringe/needle), and then had either a trigger thumb injection or an intraarticular injection of the 1st carpometacarpal joint. Either way, they shouldn’t have had “nerve damage” from either injection. The “nerve damage” was probably already there. Without a pre- and post-injection EMG/NCS, it’s impossible to know for sure. The skin atrophy and other signs can be relatively common with kenalog and other insoluble steroids. I don’t what the “thumb locking” is unless the patient means trigger thumb. Some physicians will use sterile saline injections in the atrophied area to speed up the recovery.

Kenalog steroid

kenalog steroid

Sounds like they had a DeQuervain’s injection (if it’s intratendinous instead of just under the tendon sheath there can be a lot of resistance…especially if using a tuberculin syringe/needle), and then had either a trigger thumb injection or an intraarticular injection of the 1st carpometacarpal joint. Either way, they shouldn’t have had “nerve damage” from either injection. The “nerve damage” was probably already there. Without a pre- and post-injection EMG/NCS, it’s impossible to know for sure. The skin atrophy and other signs can be relatively common with kenalog and other insoluble steroids. I don’t what the “thumb locking” is unless the patient means trigger thumb. Some physicians will use sterile saline injections in the atrophied area to speed up the recovery.

Media:

kenalog steroidkenalog steroidkenalog steroidkenalog steroidkenalog steroid

http://buy-steroids.org